kwaping


quality posts: 7 Private Messages kwaping

Add me to the list of disappointed SUCKERS. Do not buy!

lessthanthree13


quality posts: 0 Private Messages lessthanthree13
SPACERAT100 wrote:DO NOT recommend. I got this off amazon. My dog looks EXACTLY like a German Sheppard with ears that don't stand up. The vet thought she was pure bred with bad ears or a lab/shep mix. According to this test she is a beagle/boxer despite being entirely the wrong body shape for either of those breeds and having the coloration of a german sheppard. According to the test she has 0% detectable german sheppard.



We were sure our puppies had shepherd in them, too. Same litter, our girl is tan with dark colorings and our boy is black with tan points. Classic shepherd colors. Turns out they have none. Apparently those are VERY common colorings when you're combining different breeds and colorings. They came back half pitbull, quarter shar pei, and quarter mix of Jindo, Akita, Wire Fox Terrier, Finnish Spitz and Bull Terrier. Strange combo, but their mom was wild and they were rescued, and once we really looked at the characteristics of all the breeds, it makes sense. Lots of dogs have similar characteristics and what you think you see is often not what is actually there. Unless you knew your dog was bred from purebred shepherds, I would guess that the problem is with your preconceived notions more than the panel results.

daveinwarshington


quality posts: 17 Private Messages daveinwarshington

Our two dogs (rescue dogs) are of..
Ummm......
Questionable lineage.
One looks to be pure Shetland Sheepdog.
One is a Pomeranian that kept growing. 20lbs. Looks like a Spitz.
That's OK. I don't really care. They are family.

MITCHELLWOOT


quality posts: 4 Private Messages MITCHELLWOOT
MITCHELLWOOT wrote:I'm going to swab myself. Can't wait for the results!


Results were inconclusive...

thewronggrape


quality posts: 48 Private Messages thewronggrape

I'd probably be disappointed too if this test gave me results that I just couldn't believe or worse, gave me a big question mark.

However, I've done this test twice and was very happy with the results each time. One of my dogs was 50% American Bulldog and 50% American Staffordshire Terrier, and the other guy came back as 1/4 Chihuahua, 1/4 miniature pinscher, and a whole bunch of other things. I had no expectations so I'm not upset that my mutt turned out to be a mutt.

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 564 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

thewronggrape wrote:I'd probably be disappointed too if this test gave me results that I just couldn't believe or worse, gave me a big question mark.

However, I've done this test twice and was very happy with the results each time. One of my dogs was 50% American Bulldog and 50% American Staffordshire Terrier, and the other guy came back as 1/4 Chihuahua, 1/4 miniature pinscher, and a whole bunch of other things. I had no expectations so I'm not upset that my mutt turned out to be a mutt.


Mutts rule! That's all I've ever had for dogs and cats.



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Woody1


quality posts: 13 Private Messages Woody1

Bought a purebred Siberian Husky 3 years ago and flew her in from NC to OH. The breeder didn't have her registered because she couldn't rememebr which Husky was the father? Our Husky behaves like a cat, pounces like an Artic Fox and fetches better than any lab I know. So I never really trusted the breeder. Well, as shady as I thought the breeder was, my 3yr old is 100% Siberian Husky and the chart, while not so exciting seeing Huskies in every spot on the tree, makes me feel better knowing she is what she was supposed to be.Granted no matter how the test came back, we love her anyway. We also are aware of hip dysplasia(thankfully no sign or marker for it, although we had her tested when she was 3 months by the vet anyway)and a few other genetic traits. I felt that it was simple and worth the $60. The company gets a few points taken off for their lack of customer service and delivery method but I got what I paid for.

800+ woots! - Talk to the Square

bkowalski2000


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bkowalski2000

I wonder what would happen if you sent in your own DNA

lehrdude


quality posts: 2 Private Messages lehrdude

"...And remember, if you doubt his word, just go get a Labrador and he'll retrieve it!"

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
markelshark wrote:I got this last time and even with low expectations I was disappointed. Basically I knew I had a German Shepherd mix and I was hoping the kit would tell me what the "mix" part is, or at least point me in the right direction. Instead it just said "German Shepherd" for one parent and a giant question mark (literally, a picture of a question mark) for the other parent. It then listed a bunch of other breeds that it said "didn't meet the minimum threshold for significance". Thanks a lot! Save your money, buy your dog a bone and yourself a sandwich - that way you'll both actually get something out of your $.



Dear markelshark,

The Wisdom Panel® 2.0 test is able to detect purebreds present within the past three generations. Because many dogs have ancestors that are a mix of mixes going back more than three generations, there may be no recent purebreds that can be reported for recent ancestors and hence you may see a "mixed breed tag". The next five breeds that we provide are done so in an effort to give you an idea as to breeds or groups that may be present beyond three generations. Based on your description of your dog’s results, this would appear to be the case.

We take great pride in our product and stand behind our principles and thus would be happy to talk to you if you would like to discuss your dog's results. Your satisfaction is important to us. We encourage you to reach out to our Customer Care team at 888-K9 PET TEST to answer any specific questions that you may have about our test and your results.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

dernst_ca1


quality posts: 37 Private Messages dernst_ca1

Why not just take your dogs on the Maury show and have him figure it out

-JMHSRV



Proudly tracking via WootStalker.com

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
kwaping wrote:Add me to the list of disappointed SUCKERS. Do not buy!



Dear kwaping,

We are sorry to hear that you are disappointed with your purchase of Wisdom Panel® 2.0. We take great pride in our product and stand behind our principles and thus would be happy to talk to you if you would like to discuss your dog's results. Your satisfaction is important to us. We encourage you to reach out to our Customer Care team at 888-K9 PET TEST to answer any specific questions that you may have about our test and your results.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
dliidlii wrote:People who fall for this gimmick don't belong on a wisdom panel.



Dear dliidlii,

I would like to respond to your post regarding the Wisdom Panel® 2.0 test. The Wisdom Panel 2.0 ® is based on a patented technology method from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research center, and the accuracy data behind the test has been presented in talks and posters at multiple veterinary conferences including the AVMA and WSAVA meetings. The metrics used to develop and refine the test were defined by an independent peer review group of industry experts, and multiple peer-reviewed publications in academic journals have utilized our test to show that DNA analysis is more accurate than human guessing based on physical appearance of a dog. Indeed the difficulties of identifying breed by physical appearance were shown in the 1960’s by Scott and Fuller, who crossed a purebred Basenji with a purebred Beagle, and in the first generation progeny the offspring’s appearance resembled Labrador Retrievers and Border Collies not the characteristic appearance of the progenitor purebred dogs. We would be happy to talk to you through our customer care team to answer any specific questions that you may have about our test. You may reach us at 888-K9 PET TEST.

Yours sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
rubysoho wrote:Really? That's so disappointing. I have been wanting to do this forever, and almost jumped in for two. I'd be pissed if I got paperwork back with a giant question mark.



Dear rubysoho,

As we noted in our reply to the original comment, the Wisdom Panel® 2.0 test is able to detect purebreds present within the past three generations. Because many dogs have ancestors that are a mix of mixes going back more than three generations, there may be no recent purebreds that can be reported for recent ancestors and hence you may see a "mixed breed tag". The next five breeds that we provide are done so in an effort to give you an idea as to breeds or groups that may be present beyond three generations.

If you have specific questions regarding our test, please feel free to contact us at 888 K9 PET TEST.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
Sportsdad7 wrote:DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY. No offense to WOOT. This is a garbage test. We had our dog tested wanting to know the father. We had papers on the mother, a pure bred border collie. Our dog looks like a border collie and has a trait unique to border collies. The results?

Scottish Terrier mix on one side.
Dachshund / Pomerian mix on the other. The next 5 breeds listed were: Black Russian Terrier, Curly Coated Retriever, Akita, German Spitz and Chinese Shar-pei. No mention of Border Collie anywhere. Copy available for proof.

DON'T WASTE YOUR MONEY.



Dear Sportsdad7,

We are sorry to hear that you were disappointed in the results that you received when you tested your dog using our Wisdom Panel® 2.0 test. Several studies have shown that visual ID is only ~25% accurate and the Border Collie in particular is very commonly overcalled in our mixed breed dog population. Black is a dominant coat color and is very common in the canine population. The color cells start near the spinal cord and spread out from there and dogs that don't develop enough color cells will have white areas as these areas lack pigment. Because the lower parts of the body are furthest from the spinal cord, we tend to see white feet, chest, chin, and tail tips in many of dogs that lack any Border Collie ancestry.

However, we take great pride in our product and stand behind our principles and thus would be happy to talk to you if you about your dog's results. Your satisfaction is important to us. We encourage you to reach out to our Customer Care team at 888-K9 PET TEST to answer any specific questions that you may have about our test and your results.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
kellieak wrote:This is bogus. I waited for a couple years to test my mixed breed guy, hoping they would have lots of breeds by the time I tested. My dog is light reddish tan & mostly white, very long hair & tail, & weighs about 63 lbs. He came back as lots of question marks for recent generations, but strong lines of bulldog and some smaller skinny short-haired retriever-like dog. He displays pretty much 0% of the traits of the breeds they came up with.

I don't recommend this at all.



Dear kellieak,

We are sorry to hear that you were disappointed in the results that you received when you tested your dog using our Wisdom Panel® 2.0 test. Several studies have shown that visual ID is only ~25% accurate. Mixed breed dogs are the unique result of the various genes that they inherit from their ancestors and, just like humans, do not inherit all of the traits of their parents and may appear very different from the breeds in their ancestry. Dogs with very mixed ancestries like yours are great representations of the random nature in which genes are passed down. The red coat that you describe is a recessive trait so your dog did need to inherit a copy from both sides of the family tree. The Bulldog as well as most of the retrievers carry red pigment though the mixed ancestors may have as well.

However, we take great pride in our product and stand behind our principles and thus would be happy to talk to you if you would like to discuss your dog's results. Your satisfaction is important to us. We encourage you to reach out to our Customer Care team at 888-K9 PET TEST to answer any specific questions that you may have about our test and your results.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary


wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
ReginaFilangee wrote:The reason for all the poor results (re: previous posts) is because this is a cheek swab test, from a company with a very LIMITED (despite what they claim) database.

Get the BLOOD test done for DNA breed determination. Its accuracy is immensely higher. Any veterinarian can draw the blood and submit it for you.



Dear ReginaFilangee,

The breed signatures used in our Wisdom Panel® 2.0 and well as the Wisdom Panel® Professional (vet exclusive) tests both utilize our database of over 10,000 purebred dogs. The Wisdom Panel® 2.0 is easily performed at home by obtaining a cheek swab from the dog. However, the quality of the sample can vary a bit more as compared to the blood-based Professional test because we rely on the customer to obtain a good cheek-cell sample as opposed to extracting the DNA out of the white blood cells in the blood test. We have strict quality control measures in place to evaluate each sample, regardless of type, to ensure they meet our minimum levels.

If you have any additional questions, we would be happy to talk to you about our test. Please feel free to reach out to our Customer Care team at 888 K9 PET TEST.

Yours sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 564 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

wisdompanel wrote:Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary



Hey, thanks for stopping by to answer questions and discuss concerns. We appreciate it vendors take the time to visit our community.



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zolttt


quality posts: 12 Private Messages zolttt

I think a large issue with these tests is contamination. I purchased one and the dogs that came back I would not think are my dog, however I wouldnt fault the test. I read a lot of reviews from a lot of people with positive results, of course it wont work for everyone.

The wait for the results was fun, and I think some of the breeds listed could be some things that make up my dog, so it wasnt a total failure.

I ruined my signature with poor cut and paste skills

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
zolttt wrote:I think a large issue with these tests is contamination. I purchased one and the dogs that came back I would not think are my dog, however I wouldnt fault the test. I read a lot of reviews from a lot of people with positive results, of course it wont work for everyone.

The wait for the results was fun, and I think some of the breeds listed could be some things that make up my dog, so it wasnt a total failure.



Dear zolttt,

We would like to reply to your comment regarding contamination. We have very strict standards in place at our laboratory to reduce the likelihood of cross contamination which is why they carry ISO 9001 certification. However, we do recommend testing your dog in the early morning, before they have a chance to eat and play with other dogs, to reduce the chances of contamination when sampling.

Because visual ID is only ~25% accurate, it is not uncommon for clients to have questions about their dog's results. We would be happy to go over any specific questions you have regarding your test's results and would encourage you to reach out to our Customer Care team at 888 K9 PET TEST.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
clover122221 wrote:I'm a veterinarian. About year ago, there was a massive study done in which veterinary professionals (vets and vet techs) were asked to identify what they thought were the major breed(s) involved by looking at pictures of 20 dogs.

These dogs were also wisdom tested.

I believe there was one case where the test and the veterinarians agreed. It was a dalmation mix. Otherwise, the test came up with crazy answers - a dog that had short legs (eg obviously basset/corgi/dachshund) came back as like SharPei/German Shepherd.

Embrace your mixed breed dog, and if you're worried it might have a problem (like a Cavalier's congenital heart disease or a Shepherd's hips) - just ask your vet about it.

Pass.



Dear Dr. clover122221,

Thank you for your comment regarding the studies performed looking at the accuracy of visual identification. Indeed, Maddie's Fund sponsored a study at the University of Florida that looked at how well visual ID was at assigning breeds to a relinquished pet. The study poster and summary can be read here http://www.maddiesfund.org/Maddies_Institute/Articles/Incorrect_Breed_Identification.html

Similar findings indicating that visual ID is only ~25% accurate were the end result of two studies performed by Dr. Voith at Western University. "Comparison of Adoption Agency Breed Identification and DNA Breed Identification of Dogs" which was published in the Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science and "Comparison of Visual and DNA Breed Identification of Dogs and Inter-Observer Reliability" which was published in the American Journal of Sociological Research both found that visual ID was fallible.

A seminal study by Scott and Fuller performed in the 1960’s demonstrated what happened when they crossed a purebred Basenji with a purebred Beagle. The first generation progenies' appearance resembled Labrador Retrievers and Border Collies and not the characteristic appearance of the progenitor purebred dogs. Their study is included in the 1998 book Genetics and the Social Behavior of the Dog.

Certainly knowing the breed makeup of a mixed breed dog has health implications as you pointed out and for this reason we encourage clients to discuss their dog's results with their veterinarian so that an appropriate care plan can be developed.

Yours sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

Helios


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Helios

Staff

I did one of these tests awhile back with my dog and was very happy with the results. It seemed pretty accurate in my case.



wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
ElGuappo wrote:Here is their list of identifiable breeds:

http://www.wisdompanel.com/breed_count_matters/breeds_detected/

And I notice they have "professional" and "2.0" versions, which makes me wonder what the difference is in the data base (or if it is simply a more rigorous analysis).

But if they are using a database compiled from CanMap (just a guess) then while their data may be limited at this point, they should be able to tell me how much coyote is in my dog, at least make a guess. If any Mars folks are reading, please let me know if this is possible. It is a curiosity thing.



Dear ElGuappo,

Thank you for your comment. All of our Wisdom Panel® tests are intended for use on dogs and do not cover non-domesticated canids such as wolves and coyote. Presently, we are not aware of any test for coyote though UC Davis has developed a wolf and wolf hybrid test which can be purchased through them at www.vgl.ucdavis.edu

The database that we use to develop the breed signatures used in our Wisdom Panel® 2.0 as well as the Wisdom Panel® Professional (vet exclusive) tests both utilize our database of over 10,000 purebred dogs that we have sampled for inclusion. The Wisdom Panel® 2.0 is easily performed at home by obtaining a cheek swab from the dog. However, the quality of the sample can vary a bit more as compared to the blood-based Professional test because we rely on the customer to obtain a good cheek-cell sample as opposed to extracting the DNA out of the white blood cells in the blood test. We have strict quality control measures in place to evaluate each sample, regardless of type, to ensure they meet our minimum levels. In addition, the Wisdom Panel Professional test performs seven genetic mutations as well as prescreens for 28 diseases and provides your veterinarian with this information. The breed list for the Professional test also includes 235 breeds as compared to the 200 included in the swab test. The client report for both the Wisdom Panel 2.0 and Professional test vary in looks but can determine the presence of purebreds within 3 generations as well as perform an adult weight prediction.

If you have further questions about our tests, please feel free to reach out to us at 888 K9 PT TEST.

Yours sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
SPACERAT100 wrote:DO NOT recommend. I got this off amazon. My dog looks EXACTLY like a German Sheppard with ears that don't stand up. The vet thought she was pure bred with bad ears or a lab/shep mix. According to this test she is a beagle/boxer despite being entirely the wrong body shape for either of those breeds and having the coloration of a german sheppard. According to the test she has 0% detectable german sheppard.



Dear SPACERAT100,

We are sorry to hear that you were disappointed by the results that you received after using our Wisdom Panel® 2.0 product.

Your case sounds like another example of how visual ID is only ~25% accurate. The drop (down) ears that you describe are dominant so a single copy of this gene from any of the ancestors would result in this trait and both the Beagle and Boxer that we detected have this ear set. The saddle pattern that you are attributing to a German Shepherd is also carried by the Beagle which we identified in your dog. Similarly, the black muzzle (mask) of the German Shepherd is also carried by the Boxer which we reported. Hence, it sounds like your dog's physical appearance could very easily be described by the breeds that our test identified.

However, your satisfaction is very important to us and we would be happy to discuss your results further. Please feel free to reach out to our Customer Care team at 888 K9 PET TEST and we will be happy to assist you.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

Sportsdad7


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Sportsdad7
wisdompanel wrote:Dear Sportsdad7,

We are sorry to hear that you were disappointed in the results that you received when you tested your dog using our Wisdom Panel® 2.0 test. Several studies have shown that visual ID is only ~25% accurate and the Border Collie in particular is very commonly overcalled in our mixed breed dog population. Black is a dominant coat color and is very common in the canine population. The color cells start near the spinal cord and spread out from there and dogs that don't develop enough color cells will have white areas as these areas lack pigment. Because the lower parts of the body are furthest from the spinal cord, we tend to see white feet, chest, chin, and tail tips in many of dogs that lack any Border Collie ancestry.

However, we take great pride in our product and stand behind our principles and thus would be happy to talk to you if you about your dog's results. Your satisfaction is important to us. We encourage you to reach out to our Customer Care team at 888-K9 PET TEST to answer any specific questions that you may have about our test and your results.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary



I could care less about the visual looks of the dog, although it does look border collie. My biggest concern and why I recommend that NOBODY BUY THIS PRODUCT, is we know the lineage of the PURE BRED BORDER COLLIE MOTHER. And yet the test showed NO border collie at all. Personally I think you just have chimpanzees throwing darts at a wall and pick the breeds from there. Even though you supposedly had / have a money back guarantee, when I asked via email for a refund, I got no response. Ever.

EricPost


quality posts: 3 Private Messages EricPost
Sportsdad7 wrote:DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY. No offense to WOOT. This is a garbage test. We had our dog tested wanting to know the father. We had papers on the mother, a pure bred border collie. Our dog looks like a border collie and has a trait unique to border collies. The results?

Scottish Terrier mix on one side.
Dachshund / Pomerian mix on the other. The next 5 breeds listed were: Black Russian Terrier, Curly Coated Retriever, Akita, German Spitz and Chinese Shar-pei. No mention of Border Collie anywhere. Copy available for proof.

DON'T WASTE YOUR MONEY.



Sure you didn't get one of those Chinese knock off dogs??? :o) LOL

ElGuappo


quality posts: 7 Private Messages ElGuappo
wisdompanel wrote:Dear ElGuappo,

Thank you for your comment. All of our Wisdom Panel® tests are intended for use on dogs and do not cover non-domesticated canids such as wolves and coyote. Presently, we are not aware of any test for coyote though UC Davis has developed a wolf and wolf hybrid test which can be purchased through them at www.vgl.ucdavis.edu



That's what I was afraid of, I still haven't found a way to get any kind of inexpensive analysis done, even with the help of my vet.

If you guys ever considered the feasibility of this, I would pay double what you are asking for this, just to see how far removed the dogote/coydog base of the breed really is. This is for a Blue Lacy, and I bet amongst this and other coyote derived breeds you might find a market for something like that. Maybe it is already and the algorithm simply sees it as Catahoula or something.

And thank you for the personal reply, have a great day!

ericah121


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ericah121

I also had fairly low expectations for this and was still disappointed. My 30 lb. "Sheltie mix," as the rescue called him, is supposedly 25% Canaan dog (a large dog, and itself a mongrel breed), 12.5% Belgian Tervuren (a huge dog, and this one had an asterisk next to it indicating the confidence wasn't high), and the rest was all question marks. The other "possible" breeds had probabilities from 1.6 - 12%. When it comes down to it, every dog breed was at some point formed from other existing breeds, so if your dog is a true Heinz 57, you will be sorely disappointed. Now when people ask what my dog is, I just say "100% canine."

Woody1


quality posts: 13 Private Messages Woody1
SPACERAT100 wrote:DO NOT recommend. I got this off amazon. My dog looks EXACTLY like a German Sheppard with ears that don't stand up......



And if Wishes and Kisses were Gold and Love you'd be happier. I guess it's true, you got to adopt it first to know what's in it.

800+ woots! - Talk to the Square

poochie098


quality posts: 0 Private Messages poochie098
wisdompanel wrote:Dear dliidlii,

I would like to respond to your post regarding the Wisdom Panel® 2.0 test. The Wisdom Panel 2.0 ® is based on a patented technology method from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research center, and the accuracy data behind the test has been presented in talks and posters at multiple veterinary conferences including the AVMA and WSAVA meetings. The metrics used to develop and refine the test were defined by an independent peer review group of industry experts, and multiple peer-reviewed publications in academic journals have utilized our test to show that DNA analysis is more accurate than human guessing based on physical appearance of a dog. Indeed the difficulties of identifying breed by physical appearance were shown in the 1960’s by Scott and Fuller, who crossed a purebred Basenji with a purebred Beagle, and in the first generation progeny the offspring’s appearance resembled Labrador Retrievers and Border Collies not the characteristic appearance of the progenitor purebred dogs. We would be happy to talk to you through our customer care team to answer any specific questions that you may have about our test. You may reach us at 888-K9 PET TEST.

Yours sincerely,
Mars Veterinary



So for $55 your test is proven to give better results than the results of people guessing based on appearance. Wow, that is a ringing endorsement of the accuracy of your product. I'll pass.

pe5t1lence


quality posts: 7 Private Messages pe5t1lence
CarynG wrote:
IMPORTANT: Before you swab your dog's cheek, you need to kennel your dog for 3-4 hours and make sure they don 't have anything to eat, drink, or chew on. You also need to make sure you don't get your hands all over and contaminate the swab with your DNA. All of this will skew the results!




I wonder if that is where some of these negative reviews are coming from. I've had great success with the two dogs I've tried it out on. I swabbed them first thing in the morning, before they have water, food, or toys.

This stuff isn't magic, if you get a good cell scrape they pull the DNA and compare it to their database. If you get a contaminated sample your result will be off.

I can confirm that mixed breeds will have a lot of question marks, but the second page lists all the other possible dogs that could make up the question marks.

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
Sportsdad7 wrote:I could care less about the visual looks of the dog, although it does look border collie. My biggest concern and why I recommend that NOBODY BUY THIS PRODUCT, is we know the lineage of the PURE BRED BORDER COLLIE MOTHER. And yet the test showed NO border collie at all. Personally I think you just have chimpanzees throwing darts at a wall and pick the breeds from there. Even though you supposedly had / have a money back guarantee, when I asked via email for a refund, I got no response. Ever.



Dear Sportsdad7,

As per our earlier comment, we would be happy to assist you. We apologize that you did not receive a reply to your email though occasionally, people reply to our noreply email address which is not monitored. We do guarantee our product and take pride in our customer service and we hope that you will allow us to better serve you. We would ask that you please reach out to our Customer Care team at 888 K9 PET TEST or if you prefer you can email us at customercare@marsveterinary.com.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
ericah121 wrote:I also had fairly low expectations for this and was still disappointed. My 30 lb. "Sheltie mix," as the rescue called him, is supposedly 25% Canaan dog (a large dog, and itself a mongrel breed), 12.5% Belgian Tervuren (a huge dog, and this one had an asterisk next to it indicating the confidence wasn't high), and the rest was all question marks. The other "possible" breeds had probabilities from 1.6 - 12%. When it comes down to it, every dog breed was at some point formed from other existing breeds, so if your dog is a true Heinz 57, you will be sorely disappointed. Now when people ask what my dog is, I just say "100% canine."



Dear ericah121,

We are sorry to hear that you were disappointed by your results. Based on the percentages that you quote for the next five breeds, your dog's test was performed using a previous Wisdom Panel version as the Wisdom Panel® 2.0 does not include the percentages because the data was often misinterpreted. The Belgian Tervuren, though found at trace confidence, is a herding breed and in the same group as the Sheltie. Size is influenced by a variety of environmental factors such as early life nutrition, the dam's nutritional status during gestations, and early life challenges. Genetics also play a role with a gene called IGF1 being a major contributor to adult size. This gene is only responsible for ~5% of the dog's final size however so many other factors are involved as you can imagine.

However, your satisfaction is important to us and we would encourage you to reach out to our Customer Care team at 888 K9 PET TEST so that we can address your concerns.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

ericah121


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ericah121
wisdompanel wrote:Dear ericah121,

We are sorry to hear that you were disappointed by your results. Based on the percentages that you quote for the next five breeds, your dog's test was performed using a previous Wisdom Panel version as the Wisdom Panel® 2.0 does not include the percentages because the data was often misinterpreted. The Belgian Tervuren, though found at trace confidence, is a herding breed and in the same group as the Sheltie. Size is influenced by a variety of environmental factors such as early life nutrition, the dam's nutritional status during gestations, and early life challenges. Genetics also play a role with a gene called IGF1 being a major contributor to adult size. This gene is only responsible for ~5% of the dog's final size however so many other factors are involved as you can imagine.

However, your satisfaction is important to us and we would encourage you to reach out to our Customer Care team at 888 K9 PET TEST so that we can address your concerns.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary



Thank you for the reply. My dog definitely has a Tervuren coat, but more than half of him showing up as "mixed breed" was pretty disappointing on its own. I'd be curious to see if version 2.0 gave any different results; I'm just hesitant to throw another $50 at something that boils down to entertainment.

thekla


quality posts: 5 Private Messages thekla
clover122221 wrote:I'm a veterinarian. About year ago, there was a massive study done in which veterinary professionals (vets and vet techs) were asked to identify what they thought were the major breed(s) involved by looking at pictures of 20 dogs.

These dogs were also wisdom tested.

I believe there was one case where the test and the veterinarians agreed. It was a dalmation mix. Otherwise, the test came up with crazy answers - a dog that had short legs (eg obviously basset/corgi/dachshund) came back as like SharPei/German Shepherd.

Embrace your mixed breed dog, and if you're worried it might have a problem (like a Cavalier's congenital heart disease or a Shepherd's hips) - just ask your vet about it.

Pass.



thank you so much for simple common sense, backed by a medical degree, why spend $50 or more to find out that the dog that looks like a whatever, is in fact a whatever and something else, just a silly way to waste money that would be better spent donated to a shelter to help another mixed breed find a home.

thekla


quality posts: 5 Private Messages thekla
dernst_ca1 wrote:Why not just take your dogs on the Maury show and have him figure it out



might be more accurate

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
ericah121 wrote:Thank you for the reply. My dog definitely has a Tervuren coat, but more than half of him showing up as "mixed breed" was pretty disappointing on its own. I'd be curious to see if version 2.0 gave any different results; I'm just hesitant to throw another $50 at something that boils down to entertainment.



Dear ericah121,

The sable pattern and the facial mask (black muzzle) that the Belgian Tervuren exhibits are both dominant traits meaning that inheriting a single copy of these genes will result in the trait being expressed. Given that the original report indicated that your dog is likely fairly mixed, it would not be surprising to inherit these genes from mixed ancestry. However, we would encourage you to call and speak to our Customer Service team so that we are better able to address your concerns and perform an evaluation of your dog's results. We can be reached at 888 K9 PET TEST or by email at customercare@marsveterinary.com


Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

wisdompanel


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisdompanel
thekla wrote:thank you so much for simple common sense, backed by a medical degree, why spend $50 or more to find out that the dog that looks like a whatever, is in fact a whatever and something else, just a silly way to waste money that would be better spent donated to a shelter to help another mixed breed find a home.



Dear thekla,

Keep in mind, as the veterinarian mentioned, that certain breeds are prone to specific conditions. Since visual ID is only ~25% accurate, testing is the best way to determine their breed makeup to make sure that you know what your dog may be prone to. With that information in hand, your veterinarian can then develop a comprehensive care plan for your dog.

If you have further questions regarding our test, please feel free to reach out to our Customer Service team at 888 K9 PET TEST.

Sincerely,
Mars Veterinary

ElGuappo


quality posts: 7 Private Messages ElGuappo

So for anyone considering this as a curiosity item I would say it is worth it. It didn't tell me much, but it did give me some confidence in the way they interpret the markers. I will never be convinced their database is not skewed by the master samples they used; if one of their database comparison samples were omitted and then later that dog checked against the database, what would show up? Kind of a circular procedure. My registered Blue Lacy I know the lineage a considerable ways back. But they don't have that breed, so I was curious if they would find some of the genes I know (or in some cases suspect) are in my dog's makeup.

I waited awhile before sending this in, but the response took about 11 days total, faster than their estimate. That part was very nice.

The little pdf they send is very nice and informative, but one lingering question was what I would have gotten had I checked pure-breed vs mixed breed. I chose the latter since they did not have lacys in their database. And their "lineage tree" page suggested lab and assie terrier mix. meh, give them a mulligan on that one.

However, the real info that I wanted, and the part I feel is fairly accurate is the next page, where they show the top 5 most viable breed matches. I was expecting at least greyhound (strongly), some form of English sheepdog like a collie, and one or more scenthounds like a Plott, Catahoola or coonhound. Sure enough, three were collie, coonhound and greyhound.

All said, for the price it was a fun little diversion. I will likely do it again but this time specify pure breed just to see what the difference is. And Christmas coming up, this is a cool little gift that no one would imagine getting.

Thanks Wisdom panel, you get this user's approval!